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EmThree
2374 days ago
 
My indoor photos have a somewhat yellow tinge

I've noticed this a lot and I'm guessing it's white my white balance. My house is mostly filled with Fluorescent lights but there are a few tungsten lights. I have the white balance set to flourecent I think. They still look okay, but I'd like them if they looked like how I saw them through the view finder.

I'm shooting with a Rebel Xti (Canon)


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Chuck
2374 days ago
 
Experiment with the white balance.
Or add blue in Photoshop.

Fluorescent lights are hard to work with...


~Chuck~ http://www.chucksphotospot.com

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sandinmysh
oes

2374 days ago
 
i agree with chuck. ply around with the white balance. if you dont know how to set this up try this: (i didnt know until i read this somewhere)

idk what camera youre using but my canon has a setting to where i have to bring up the menu and hit something while the 'set the white balance menu' is on the screen. make sure you are testing it out on a -white spot only- int he room where you are shooting. if there are no white spots (for example a wall or a desk) grab a blank sheet of paper and use that. do not just focus in the entire room and then set the wb. thats why it's 'white' balance. maybe you knew this but i sure didnt. hope this helps.


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skydvr
2373 days ago
 
You can set the white balance to "auto" and it should handle it pretty well.  Or, if you're shooting RAW, you can change the WB setting within your RAW importer.

Or, I *think*, within most editors, you can set WB by picking a spot on the photo that is pure white, and the editor will adjust the photo.

Good luck.

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ben-s
2372 days ago
 
bleh. I'm sure I replied a cpuple of days ago, but it seems to have got lost...
I find that my Canon is a often a bit warm.
If you're shooting RAW, it's easy to correct it to your taste in processing, if JPEG, you need to get it right in camera.

If your WB is set to flourescent, anything lit with tungsten will be warm.
You can't easily mix tungsten and fluorescent unless you gel one or other of the light sources - something which is probably impractical.
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EmThree
2372 days ago
 
I decided to go Custom White Balance and set it to a picture of my wall. It works great now big_smile


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lea2oh
2368 days ago
 
I really need to try the white sheet of paper thing.  I like to take pictures of my daughter and her teammates playing basketball.  The lights in each gym are different and this will help.  Thanks

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ben-s
2367 days ago
 
lea2oh;
Try it with care in a gym / sports hall - the lights are usually HPS (High Pressure Sodium) and generally emit only a few colours - the strongest line is orange, but there are sometimes a few other colours in the mix too.

You might be able to reduce the effect somewhat with a custom WB, but I doubt you'll get brilliant colour representation.

Obviously, it's well worth trying, because you will probably see some improvement, just don't expect miracles smile

I don't know what kind of camera you have, but you might want to try adding a flashgun if you have a hotshoe.
If you want to get adventurous, you could go for a strobist style setup:
http://strobist.blogspot.com/2006/03/lighting-101.html

Have fun!
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lea2oh
2367 days ago
 
I generally have to do a lot of editing on the pictures when I get them on the computer.  I am using a Nikon Coolpix 8700.  I have the hotshoe and flash, but have been asked not to use it in some places.  That makes me leary to try again.  I think my daughter would walk off the court if I got too carried away.

My backgrounds usually look a greenish cast.  What's with that? There does seem to be a lot of orange tint, but each gym is different.  Our home gym, luckily has the best lighting. 

I'd like to step up to a different camera, but would like to stay with Nikon.  Does anyone know how the D300 is doing indoors?

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ben-s
2367 days ago
 
Green casts are usually associated with fluoresecent lighting, although IIRC there is a green line in HPS lamps too.

As regards using flash, you could ask the organisers beforehand, and perhaps offer them copies of some of your images of the game? I don't know what level they're playing at, but if it's not covered by another photographer (from the press etc), the organisers might be pleased with some images. - Just a thought.

I'm not really in a position to comment on Nikon DSLRs, as my entire Nikon digital experience consists of 2 days with a D50 smile
As far as I know, the D300 has received good reviews on the whole.
You might want to check out DPreview.com, as they are an impartial, trusted site.
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lea2oh
2367 days ago
 
Thanks, I'll be sure to check that site.

I love all these ideas to try.

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beckyw
2361 days ago
 
I fought this problem several weeks ago.  You need to set the white balance manually.  What I did was go to ebay and search for "white balance lens cap".  I have bought two of these, each was from a different seller from two different countries at that.  They were identical.  I did not pay over $10 for either one of them including shipping.  I had to have one for each of the two lens I have for my camera.  They are sized to fit the lens.  They come as an empty ring that screws on your lens and a cap that pops on.  This will become your lens cap.  To set the white balance just follow the instructions of your camera to set the white balance manually.  On my Pentax, I set to manual white balance, point at the light source with the cap on, press the shutter and click ok to accept.  Then I take my lens cap off and shoot away.  I am set as long as I don't change the shooting location.  My DS has been playing basketball in a gym with horrible gym lighting.  My photos at the beginning of the season were a disaster, very orange, weird color.  Most I did shoot RAW so I can recover them.  My photos now have wonderful color.  It is so much easier to have this little tool and get the white balance right at the beginning.

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